Friday, July 27, 2012

Whip those Buns into Shape!

wheat-free, gluten-free, grain-free sandwich buns
I've been working on this recipe for a while now. It takes a long time for me to work on recipes because I have to wait for us to finish eating what I've made before trying something else. There's only two of us! I came across a recipe for low-carb buns on Pinterest. I got tired of paleo bread really fast, I think because of the coconut flavor, so I needed something more neutral tasting.

I was impressed with the idea, but not the recipe. It needed some tweaking. I had a problem with the buns being too eggy and too greasy. As you can see from my photo, the bun on the right has egg settling on the bottom. I set out to fix it! I think I went through about six or seven different versions before settling on the perfect proportion of ingredients. The results of my tinkering you can see on the left. I also found it important to really whip the batter well to fully incorporate the eggs. I highly recommend using a blender or food processor to get those buns whipped into shape!

As for what the buns are baked in, there are a couple of possibilities. I like to use 4" ramekins. I find they make the perfect size bun for sandwiches or for toasting. You can buy them individually at Target. Another idea is to use a whoopie pie pan, which doesn't require slicing the bun in half since it will be so thin. If you want to use them for sandwiches, just use two thin whoopie buns.




Quick and Easy Wheat-Free Sandwich Buns
This recipe is not low-FODMAP*
makes 6 buns
wheat-free, gluten-free, grain-free sandwich buns

Ingredients

4 eggs
3 tablespoons oil (for neutral taste, use canola or extra light olive)
1/2 cup cold water
2/3 cup almond flour
1/2 cup flax seed meal*
3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions
  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease 6 - 4" ramekins or a 12-count whoopie pie pan.
  2. In a blender or food processor, pulse all ingredients together until well mixed. Pour evenly into ramekins or pan. Bake 25 to 30 minutes or until dry on the tops.
  3. Cool in pans, then turn out and slice in half. If using a whoopie pie pan, slicing is not necessary.

*Almond flour is high in fructans and flax seed has not been tested for FODMAP content, so this recipe is not appropriate for the elimination phase of the low-FODMAP diet.

**Update 8/18/2012: I realized that for whatever reason, I forgot to type in the Parmesan cheese as an ingredient. I apologize for any confusion!

9 comments:

  1. I just made these for lunch and they turned out amazing! Thank you so much for sharing this recipe! I'm so glad to finally have found a bread recipe that I can eat that actually works!

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    1. Awesome! I'm so glad these worked for you. :)

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  2. Dianne, do you have a suggestion to replace the almond flour? It is not allowed (as far as I know) in my fodmap-diet. I a also doing wheat-belly and there buckwheat is allowed but that is better not to use for me too because I have to loose weight.

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    1. The only thing that might work to replace the almond flour would be another nut flour, like hazelnut or walnut or even sunflower seed flour.

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  3. I am late in finding you blog, but I'm glad I found this recipe. I have had almond and coconut flour in my fridge for about a year. My one attempt was not great and while I like almonds, didn't care for the taste in the cookies I made, and I like crunchy, not soft. Anyway, I have been GF for about 15 yrs and do not really enjoy any of the breads I have tried. They are ok, just not worth the price so I have pretty much stopped. I saw your recipe and immediately made it. Wow! Again, I am way too picky about my bread. Your recipe scores way high. I sliced it, put a couple of garden tomatoes on top and took a bite. Again, wow! Needed more flavor and had a slice of sausage, split in half and together it was even better. Super easy to put together, and quick. Soft texture. Doesn't taste like almond flour at all or feel like it. This is a keeper.

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    1. Glad you liked it. Thanks for the comment!

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  4. Can oat flour be used instead of almond?

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    1. Oat flour is very different than almond flour, so I'm not sure if it would be a good substitute in this recipe.

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  5. Would you be able to give us a carb and calorie count? I just made them and they're still cooling in the ramekins. I want to see if they will hold up as the buns for homemade Egg McMuffins.

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