Monday, April 1, 2013

White Rice Flour Yeast Bread (Gluten-Free, Low-Fructose)

gluten-free white rice flour yeast bread, sliced loaf

I've already shared my recipe for yeast bread made with sorghum flour, but I really wanted to find a good recipe for bread made with white rice flour. I know some of you out there with fructose malabsorption are super-sensitive and may not be able to tolerate sorghum flour. I seem to tolerate it fine, and I like to use it because it's higher in fiber and protein than white rice flour. But still, I wanted to find a white rice flour bread recipe.

gluten-free white rice flour yeast bread, sliced loaf

I came across this recipe on Pinterest. It's from King Arthur Flour. We sell a lot of King Arthur products in my natural foods department, so I knew this was probably going to be a great recipe. I was not disappointed. I adapted it to use white rice flour instead of brown rice. I think it turned out great. My husband and I were so excited to try it, we had it for dinner that very night I made it, dipping it in olive oil and vinegar, like a restaurant. Unfortunately, it does dry out quickly, so either eat or freeze it within a day or two. If you don't...well, it's also delicious as toast too.

Just remember to resist the urge to let the bread rise too much in the loaf pan. If the bread rises too much, it will collapse. I know this from experience! There is also sugar in this bread, but it is needed to "feed" the yeast so it rises. It's a small amount of sugar. If you slice the loaf into, say, 16 slices, that would be about 1/2 teaspoon sugar per slice. Which is 2 grams of sugar per slice, half of which is fructose. So, low-fructose, but not fructose-free. Good enough for me!

black pug and bread photo shoot

Before I share the recipe with you, I just had to share this photo of my pug Moo Moo. She photobombed one of my food photos again! I think she really wants a piece of bread, what do you think?


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White Rice Flour Yeast Bread
Low-FODMAP, Gluten-Free
adapted from King Arthur Flour
makes 1 loaf
gluten-free white rice flour yeast bread, sliced loaf

Ingredients

2 cups white rice flour
2/3 cup potato starch
1/3 cup tapioca starch/flour
3 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons instant (quick-rise or rapid-rise) yeast
1 1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 teaspoon xanthan gum or guar gum
1 cup warm lactose-free milk (or tolerable non-dairy alternative)
1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened (or non-dairy alternative)
3 large eggs

Directions

  1. In a large mixing bowl or the bowl of your stand mixer, mix together the white rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch, sugar, yeast, salt and xanthan gum.
  2. Slowly pour in the warm milk while mixing on low. Add the butter and beat until thoroughly blended.
  3. Add the eggs one at a time, beating after each addition. Scrape the bottom and sides of bowl. Beat the batter for 3 minutes on high.
  4. Cover bowl and let batter rise for one hour in a warm place.
  5. Scrape down sides of bowl once again to gently deflate the batter. Grease an 8" x 4" loaf pan and pour batter into pan. Smooth out the top using a spatula. Cover (with plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray) and let rise in a warm place just until loaf barely crowns above the rim of the pan, about 20 to 25 minutes.
  6. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Bake the bread until golden brown, about 38 to 40 minutes.


25 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. She is, isn't she? And she knows it too!

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    2. I'm going to make this today. My husband is allergic to corn and possibly wheat so this southern cookin' girl needed help. Now, I have to find guar gum.

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  2. Oh, and the bread looks good too!

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  3. hey there!

    do i really need to use xantham gum here? it's pretty hard to get where i'm from so i was wondering if i could omit it!
    thanks :) the recipe looks goood

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    Replies
    1. I'm not sure. I haven't tried baking it without xanthan gum, but I'm afraid it would make the bread too crumbly to leave it out.

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    2. Amazon.com there are tons of companies that sell it on there. Many with free shipping :)

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  4. Hi, I have all purpose gluten free flour (contains White rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch, guar gum, salt). Would it make sense if I do not add the potato starch, tapioca starch/flour, xanthan gum? Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, if you are using an all-purpose flour, do not add the potato starch, tapioca flour and xanthan. Use 3 cups of the all-purpose flour instead.

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  5. FINALLY. This is the fourth loaf of gluten-free bread I've made in the past two weeks. I was put on an ulcerative colitis diet and (long story short) now 75% of the food I eat daily is a gluten-free bread with no or nearly no fiber, so trying to eat my last three loaves when they tasted like cardboard was tough. I did get progressively better at it but this ratio of the three flours is GOLD. I honestly cannot believe the difference from my last loaf; the ingredients were almost identical but my last one only used rice flour and tapioca flour. I made adjustments to the other ingredients given my dietary restrictions (honey in place of sugar, regular yeast activated in warm water, 2 eggs but more xanthan gum, etc) but I am sure that the original recipe would have been just as amazing. All I can say is thank you!!

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    Replies
    1. Fabulous! I'm so glad you got this recipe to work for you. Thanks for the feedback!

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    2. Meg, could you give me your adjustments to this recipe? I want to use less eggs, but I probably need to add some other liquid.

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  6. Thank you for this new version! It's exactly what I need for my DH who is indeed supersensitive about some of those alternative grains. P.S. I am a big fan of your wonderful blog. :-)

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  7. Just mixed up my first try. I never had what I call a batter. Mine was more like a very stiff blob. What did I do wrong? Waiting to see if it even rises the first hour.

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    Replies
    1. It sounds like you had maybe too much flour. When I measure gluten-free flours, I lightly spoon them into the measuring cup and then level off to make sure the flour doesn't get compacted, ending up with too much flour.

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  8. Dianne, I tried your recipe and it did fine, but the bread had a strange smell. It's not my first trial with GF bread and all of them have this strange smell. Some are smellier than others. Is it something to do with all GF breads?
    Thanks

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    Replies
    1. I'm not sure. Gluten-free bread is going to smell different from wheat bread just because it's made of different grains. I don't think it's a bad smell, just different.

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  9. Should I make any adjustments to use this recipe in a breadmaker?

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    Replies
    1. I'm not sure it will work in a breadmaker. Maybe one that has a gluten-free setting, but I haven't tested that.

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    2. I went ahead and gave it a shot, came out great! I'm so excited! I have sever grass allergies so I can't eat wheat, oats, barley, sorghum, or anything so this is a God send!! Thanks Diane!!

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  10. Heather Morgan, what setting did you use on your breadmaker? I would love to try this as my daughter has grain allergies and this is the first recipe I've found that looks good!

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  11. My husband has a serve allergies towards eggs, is there anything else I can use to substitute them?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Iesha, I haven't tried making this bread without eggs, but I would suggest trying to make it with EnerG Egg Replacer.

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  12. Hi,

    Can I replace the potato starch with others? such as corn starch? and Xanthan gum with agar-agar because it's hard to get those product here and if I buy online then hard to get in to my country.
    thanks.

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    Replies
    1. I think it would work fine to sub cornstarch for the potato starch. I'm not sure about agar-agar, never having used it before. But it's probably worth a try!

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