Thursday, June 20, 2013

White Rice Quick Bread & Buns

White Rice Quick Bread

This recipe has been a long time in the making. It took me months to get it just right and I'm pleased with the results. This quick bread recipe is gluten-free, dairy-free and very low fructose. It's also low-FODMAP, of course. It's mostly made with white rice flour, tapioca flour and eggs. All of which are considered "safe" foods.

White Rice Quick Buns

When I first started this low-fructose/low-FODMAP diet for IBS and fructose malabsorption, I really wish I had a recipe like this. Just a basic, easy bread recipe that can be used for sandwiches. It is perfect for an elimination diet too. I find that real sugar (not dextrose) works best to help keep the bread moist. At only one tablespoon for the entire recipe, it shouldn't be anything to worry about for most people. But if you do want to use dextrose, I have included directions for that.

White Rice Quick Buns

Keep in mind that this is not like ordinary wheat bread. It is egg-based, so it has a different texture and flavor. It also makes a small loaf, smaller than your typical loaf of bread. But it's a fine vehicle for making your favorite sandwiches or even hamburgers. Yes, you can make buns too! Sometimes I just really want a hamburger, so now I have this bun recipe, which is great since we are in prime hamburger-grilling season!




White Rice Quick Bread or Buns
Low-FODMAP, Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Low-Fructose
makes 1 loaf or 6 buns
White Rice Quick Bread

Ingredients
1 cup white rice flour
1/2 cup tapioca flour
1 tablespoon sugar (or 1 1/2 tablespoons powdered dextrose*)
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon guar gum or xanthan gum
4 large eggs
2 tablespoons oil (grapeseed, olive or organic canola)
1 teaspoon vinegar

Directions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F(*325 degrees if using dextrose). Lightly grease a 8”x 4” or 7.5” x 3.5” loaf pan or 6 - 4” ramekins.
  2. Stir together the white rice flour, tapioca flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt and guar gum.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs on medium speed one minute or until frothy. Beat in the oil and vinegar.
  4. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture and mix well. Pour into prepared pan or ramekins. Sprinkle with sesame seeds if desired. Bake for 20 minutes for the buns or 30 minutes for the loaf (*add about 5 minutes to baking time if using dextrose), or until toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool, remove from pan(s) and slice.



23 comments:

  1. Hi can you substitute anything for the guar gum? Would Xantham gum work?

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    1. Yes, xanthan gum would work fine. I've updated the ingredients to say either or. Thanks for asking - great question!

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    2. Thanks for getting back to me so quickly! Might try these tonight :)

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    3. Dianne: But, print option still shows just the guar option.

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  2. These look fantastic! I like the ramekin idea. Bookmarked it to try this week. I'm going to try a low FODMAP protocol. Thanks :)

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    1. I hope both the bread and the diet work for you! :)

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  3. This looks beautiful! What happens if you do not use either xanthan or guar gum? I am trying to avoid these additives, concerned they might be upsetting my stomach. Thank you!

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    1. The bread might be a little crumbly, but there is enough egg in there it might hold it together enough. I'm not sure, so you'll just have to try it.

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    2. Thought this might help
      http://gluten-free-bread.org/5-alternatives-to-xanthan-gum-and-guar-gum-in-gluten-free-baking

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    3. I never use xanthum gum--this bread held together perfectly fine for me. :)

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  4. Just baked the bread, and tried it. Very good. My only problem is the bread did not bake evenly. The center part sort of rose up at an angle, like a slanted roof, while the edges stayed flat. Not sure why. I was using a glass bread pan. I was also wondering if i double the recipe and but bake it in one pan to make a bigger size loaf, would that work? Or the bread will not be able to bake through properly, leaving the outer parts too dry while the middle is baking? Any thoughts?

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    1. The bread does tend to crack on the side instead of the middle, as you can see in my photos. I'm not really sure why it does that, but it could be due to the small size and nature of the recipe. I haven't tried baking it in a larger pan, but I think it could work, maybe if you decreased the oven temp a little and baked it for longer. Let me know if it works!

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  5. Do the hamburger buns "bend" at all, or do you have to use caution while chewing through them and a hamburger? Just wondering ;)

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    1. I think they do bend, but they are stiffer than regular wheat buns.

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  6. Hey, sorry to bug you with yet more questions. I made this bread yesterday and it came out extremely dry, and kind of flaky or crumbly. The shape of the slices were the size of biscotti. I used Brown rice thinking that it was basically the same as white rice, but after doing some researchi find it that they are not. I am new to baking and using gluten free flours. I find this blog but the info was a bit overwhelming: http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/2008/12/baking-cooking-substitutions-for-gluten.html?m=1
    What I think I understand is to use less brown rice and more starch and maybe more moisture? Any help will be greatly appreciated! Once I try to use up the brown rice flour that I bought, I am switching to white rice flour since most of your recipes call for that and I intend on trying them all!

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    1. Hmmm, I haven't tried this with brown rice flour, so I can't say for sure what the problem might be. But if the bread came out dry, then adding more moisture definitely would help.

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  7. You say "This quick bread recipe is gluten-free, dairy-free and very low fructose. It's also low-FODMAP, of course. It's mostly made with white rice flour, tapioca flour and eggs. All of which are considered "safe" foods." Just curious how this recipe can be considered dairy free when it contains four eggs. I'm new to this kind of diet, so sorry if I've missed something.

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    1. Although eggs are sold in the dairy department of grocery stores, they are not actually dairy. "Dairy" is anything made with cow's milk (milk, ice cream, cheese, yogurt, etc.) Eggs come from chickens. It's a fairly common misconception because of where eggs are located in the store!

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  8. How well will these bread recipes work in a bread maker?

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    1. I have not tried this recipe in a bread machine, but since it is a quick bread recipe, I wouldn't recommend it.

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